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Updated on Saturday, April 16

#23698

OMG: For any alum out there. What has been your experience with negotiating your salary for your first job? Just received my first offer which is a decent bit lower than I think is fair based on the research I've done into related positions and the information I've gathered from other recent grads. So for specific questions: in your experience, are initial offers always negotiable? What percentage higher than the initial offer do you think is reasonable to respond with (10% or 20%)? I feel 10-20% more would be more consistent with typical salaries in this role. Any tips would be appreciated

9 comments

  1. Suck it up and just do it, there are people making minimum wage on co-op and it isn't their first work term.

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    Replies
    1. He isn't talking about a first coop job, idiot. Hence why he's asking alum. Work on your reading comprehension.

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  2. you can try, but having another better offer would be the best bargaining tool you could have

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  3. Negotiating a salary?? Lol. The vast majority of people don't have that privilege these days. Unless you're a minor celebrity who people are competing for, you take what you can get.

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  4. 3 is exaggerating but there's definitely not much wiggle room in most entry-level positions. Once you're established and leaving a good job for an even better one people will be willing to butter you up.

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  5. It doesn't hurt to ask, politely, if they can go up by 15%. It's not uncommon for them to counter with a modest increase. In one particular case a friend had been wildly low balled in her offer, I told her so and she negotiated up 30%.

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  6. It's definitely worthwhile attempting to negotiate, but always have a solid reason behind your request. For example, if you have more work experience or education than the stated minimums in the job ad, or if you have additional skills which may be valued in the company (even if not for this job). Many people think "It's not worth negotiating over $X thousand dollars", but remember this initial increase is likely to be multiplied over your whole working life (since you will refer back to your ending salary when negotiating future jobs), so a $3k increase now X a 35 year working life is an additional >$105,000.

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  7. OP here. Thanks for the tips and suggestions all. I asked for 20% more, they came back with 10% and we settled at 15%.

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  8. Awesome! It's a reflection of how much they value what you bring to the table.

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