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Updated on Sunday, April 3

#23674

OMG: Don't get discouraged regarding finding work. A lot of people are in similar situations. Just keep trying.

9 comments

  1. Job markets are oversaturated because of massive competition. The truth is that a university education no longer guarantees a good job. This is what the school system will never tell you. They want you to believe you will have a great job, because that's how they make money, by selling a lie. Many people will end up working shitty part time or contract job for years after graduation now, sometimes for a lifetime.

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    1. Why are you painting out this picture of doom and gloom... like come on..? Work hard and things go your way. Its truly all about working hard and you will get the position you want. Stop being so pessimistic.

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    2. Oversaturation really depends on what sector you're talking about.

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    3. This is really not news though, and it isn't true that school don't tell you this. I have had many professors say that you need than just a uni degree to be competitive in the job market

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    4. congrats here: congrats!

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  2. 1b has it right. Some markets are actually under-staffed. Then there's also other parts of the world where your skills could be in high demand. In my personal experience its about standing out rather than "being competitive". A large % of the jobs in Ontario are through small and medium businesses. Getting hired in a company like that is about being a good fit in terms of personality and willingness to learn.

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    1. I like your comment about "other parts of the world." This is definitely the case from personal experience. In the local Ontario region I have found it nearly impossible to find work even with my background, (three trades, some university for two programs, years of experience), but I've received interest for my skills in the E.U. (Switzerland, Germany, Belgium, the U.K.), and the U.S. (East and West coast).

      It really depends on the "gate keepers," ie. HR, if they are competent. With a number of small-medium sized businesses the owners take a large role in hiring and development and not many have the skills needed.

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    2. Ugh, HR. I get why they're needed in big companies but hiring should be handled at least in part by the department hiring. Otherwise you get people with cookie cutter experience who's personality makes them a match for an HR position and not the one they get.

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    3. Sometimes the hiring is done so far from the department in need it's mind boggling. I worked for an international headhunting firm some years ago and it was interesting.

      What would happen is the client, where ever in the world, would go through their process and place their order with my employer in the U.S. The Americans would contact our Canadian office who in turn would contact our region and ultimately our office. Then my manager would delegate the responsibility to a recruiter, who in turn would dump the process onto me as a clerk. So as a clerk I would "mine resumes" to find suitable candidates and initiate the process. So really all the power was concentrated to a clerk for these business juggernauts. Crazy.

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