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Updated on Wednesday, October 7

#21379

OMG: Privilege really isn't about what you recognize or what you see. It's about what others see in you. if you are white and poor or white and come from a tragic home environment that exists because you are poor, then you have somehow bypassed your white privilege. But conflating racial privilege with class privilege just doesn’t work when compared to the actual facts.

19 comments

  1. Huh? I can't tell what point you are trying to make, but I'm pretty sure its retarded.

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    1. 'I can't understand this concept so you must be retarded' OK there but I can smell the privilege.

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    2. No, really.

      The second and third sentences don't fit together at all. Has the white privilege been bypassed or not? What "just doesn't work"? And most importantly, what are the the "actual facts"?

      Sorry, even though some black people call it "acting white", being able to form an argument and string a clear sentence together isn't because of my white privilege.

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    3. No, really, wtf are you going on about 'acting white'? Op didn't say shit about that. Get your head out of your ass.

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    4. ^ 1A - "I can smell the privelege." LMAO dunnoe fam u went off on this bitch right hur dkm

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  2. + 1 privilege doesn't mean you're fucking blessed, it just means you haven't had to experience shit others do. It's invisible for fuck's sake so don't argue how you don't have it because of hardship x, y or z.

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  3. OP could have said it better. But basically OP is just saying that just because you went through this and this issue, that doesn't mean your privilege (being white, straight, wealthy etc. etc.) doesn't exist. It has nothing to do with you, but everything to do with how SOCIETY sees you.

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    1. Critical theorists love to point out how various aspects of your history and your person come together in complex ways to affect your relationships with other people and with institutions. We've understood this for a very long time, of course. The real question, rarely addressed in fundamental terms, is one of normativity: what lessons do we draw?

      Intersectionality takes as a given that we are meant to dissolve power structures, as if such a thing were even coherent let alone desirable. This tension is resolved by focusing on issues of immediate relevance (trans* rights, say) and eschewing core questions: What kind of life should we live? What is good? etc. In terms of moral foundations, intersectionality is a vacuum, it points to perceived injustices but lacks a worthy theory of justice.

      Modern social justice advocates see many aspects of human life as zero sum which are not so, including: enabling agency and accumulating social and economic capital.

      One way the notion of privilege is used is to discount someone's perspective or to stop conversations. It is not empowerment to shut down conversation. That aim, itself an exercise of power, is easily co-opted and anyways does nothing to address the issues at hand. Moreover, when such techniques are adopted by the institutional authorities they do not facilitate "social justice" for long--instead they serve institutions as you would expect them too. (Cf. the British activist feminist arrested for several of her #killallmen tweets. A natural conclusion to stifling impulses.)

      The same goes for issues of racial privilege. Mandated diversity turns people of colour into props, it robs them of their accomplishments. We can't have this issue both ways: either we look to redress the real systemic problems (family structure and childhood economic conditions) or we mask the issue by picking less qualified adults and then shutting our eyes, plugging our ears, and pretending they're not actually less qualified. How is that supposed to help, again? (Just look at the Yi-Fen Chou/Michael Derrick scandal for an example of this.)

      So long live the open society and to hell with all this mindless talk of privilege. The concept of privilege doesn't lend much descriptive power to the world and it sure as hell doesn't give us a way forward.

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    2. Tl;dr racism is real but don't do it to me.

      Don't call me privileged its not faaaaair and just as bad as racism.

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    3. More like:

      tl;dr - call me what you want but this privilege discourse has no explanatory power and does nothing to solve the problems intersectionalists purport to care about. Moreover social justice advocates smuggle highly contestable normative premises into these discussions and we should repudiate that practice.

      Focusing on privilege is about exercising power by leveraging guilt and it's almost purely destructive.

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    4. 'Advocates smuggle highly contestable normative premises' that's just word salad bruh.

      Focusing on privilege is about calling out inequalities to learn how we can grow from them and measure the way different groups of people are treated in different societies. The people with privilege are the ones with power, and its the disprivileged that would seek a level field and to not be spoken for. And you do seem keen to talk over others' experiences and define what is 'destructive'.

      So that's a smug and highly conestable normative premise that should be repudiated in practice and discission. To quote some nice adjective overkill.

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    5. Power is an inevitability arising from human difference which renders the idea that we're "getting rid of power" downright incoherent. What we should be concerned with is the proper exercise of power. Not all power is bad. One of the most sacred human relationships, that between parent and child, is incredibly unequal in terms of power. The same goes for teachers and students. But these are not disfigured relationships, with good parents and teachers they are the height of human experience! Disempowerment as its own end is simply wrongheaded from the start.

      And as for inequality per se, who cares? Again, this is exactly the sort of thing at odds here.

      We should start with questions like, What is the good life? How do we enable people to live a good life? How do we diminish the abuse of power?

      If these answers entail intersectional analyses (and I would put to you: thousands of years of human wisdom suggest they do not, at least not substantially) then fine. But inequality and power dynamics are not a starting point.

      In practice, the effect of social justice activism is to chill conversations on controversial topics, to encourage conformity, and to elevate victimhood to the point where people find it desirable. The victim/oppressor dichotomy is probably the most perverse aspect of these trends. All in all, any long-run success with these measures will be as bad for social justice types as for anyone else, institutions will bend these tools to their own ends with ugly effects like those already mentioned.

      So hopefully we re-live the '90s and see the downfall of this insipid ethos.

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    6. What the fuck? You're going to need intense medical assistance to get that big head out of your ass.

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    7. Sure. Or maybe in 10 years you'll realize this SJW shit is fucking retarded. Just like the last time it rolled around.

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    8. I feel like you're equating OP's point to some larger theory of 'SJW shit' and coflating that with something else too?? Nah not about that lazy ass groupings and assumptions.

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    9. Without the normative force I described there's literally no reason to care about privilege. And the theory of justice and right conduct underlying intersectional analysis, as I said, is wrongheaded at its most basic level.

      So let's make no assumptions about the moral aspect and just take this privilege stuff on its own:

      M1: "Hey man, you're like super privileged."
      M2: "Yup."
      M1: "Ok the, take care! Enjoy the privilege!"

      I mean hey, if that's all we're doing then let's keep on keeping on. idgaf

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  4. (No reason to care about privilege *per se*; also, "Ok the... " -> "Ok then... ")

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  5. Must be something feminist/gender studies related. The magical theories that exist because you can't prove they exist. Religious studies bleeding over.

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