OMG UPDATE: Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get updates on updates!

Updated on Wednesday, October 15

#19942

OMG: I just need to vent this:
Since transferring to University from College, I have never felt so misplaced, and frankly, stupid.

I was the top of my class at college. I didn't struggle for grades, and I felt respected by the teachers. I graduated with a 94 percent average.

At university, while I don't struggle to pass, I struggle to maintain the same high grades. (current average: 85). While I know on a rational level that 85 is a great average and that I am simply being too hard on myself, I can help but feel like I am failing. 

I am struggling to allow myself to make mistakes. I am struggling to accept that these two institutions are very different and there is no point in comparing my performance between the two. I am struggling to feel passion and drive in my studies.

I am enough. I am smart. I am capable. 
I need to accept these statements.

21 comments

  1. Well, I'm not sure why you find this drop in grades shocking. Think about the type of students that typically attend college compared to university. University is much more difficult to get into than college, thus more people who are academically brighter (without trying to be offensive to those who go to college). University is attended by a vast range of students and a substantial amount of those hoping to get into some sort of graduate program (MA, law, medicine). There is some obvious differences between the type of students that attend and as well the structure. College is a lot more hands on and I'm assuming you receive more attention by professors to you, while university is more independent sort of learning. Keep working hard! :D

    ReplyDelete
  2. 85 is a really great average for university, why do you mind? Don't judge yourself based on your marks but on the quality of your contributions to the people around you. The best compliment a parent can give a child is "your hard work paid off, good job!" not "you're so smart". And that's the best compliment you can give yourself. Relying on intelligence will only disappoint you when it eventually fails.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Abstract thought is difficult! The only person here who isn't acknowledging your talents and abilities is yourself.

    You will NOT feel passionate and driven about everything you study. That's a simple fact. However, as long as you remain keenly aware of your interests, and your own needs and emotions, you will be happy with where you end up. Just be honest with yourself, that's all. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OP here: Thanks, I needed to hear this.

      Delete
  4. try the same with a 75

    ReplyDelete
  5. Perhaps forget about grades and simply study things because they interest you. If not, simply get over with it and maybe think of switching courses.

    A 85 average is good, but everyone can reach a close to perfect average if the correct method is adopted. Do not abandon, use and improve your intelligence to even greater extents and most importantly, stay inspired.

    I obtained high grades in college too and I believe one can maintain his high grades at any institution under any circumstances. In other words, if you could get a 94 in college, there is no reason you can not get a 94 at UW.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In a Math or Science program, maybe. In an Arts program, there is little to no chance in hell of getting a 94% average. Most arts profs simply don't give out grades higher than 90%. Just a fact.

      Grades don't mean anything outside of the confines of university, and very little even then.

      Delete
    2. LOL 5a Math courses structure their exams so that the class average comes out to 60-65%. Pretty hard to get grades in the 70s, let alone higher.

      Delete
    3. 5.b Not 5a but I agree with 5a despite being in math, and having a CAV just under 80. While it might be more difficult to get an 80 in a math course than it is in an arts course, you will still see people in math courses get 100 which you won't see as much in arts. The difference is our grades are more scattered. A lot of people get grades between 40-60 which really lowers the average, but there are a few geniuses who go and get 100 in Math 249/247/245

      Delete
    4. 5a here. 5c understands what I was saying, which is not that Math/Science courses have higher class averages, but that in those courses, it is possible to get 90% to 100% for an individual, and people do it. In Arts, though, what does it mean to get 100%? (That is such an Arts question, so I'm sorry for reinforcing stereotypes.) You really can't do it in Arts courses, or shouldn't be able to, although agree with 5c that Arts grades are grouped more tightly, in the 70% to 80% range. In Arts it is usually very difficult to break the 80%, 85% barrier, and you just can't reach that 95% to 100% region, except in exceptional circumstances.

      Delete
  6. OP I have an 85 avg... are you telling me I should be worried?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I bet you were always 'smart' instead of a 'hard worker' - put some elbow grease into it and earn your 90s if you want it so badly.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Lmao. Humble brag

    ReplyDelete
  9. I graduated from Undergrad with a 73% overall average. I got into a Master's program at two universities-- one of which was on a full scholarship.

    I would argue that individual grades are more important than your average. There are certain courses that you will take that you will love and want to do a good job in. For me, those courses were not about grades, they were about getting to know a subject and really wanting to contribute to the body of knowledge that makes up that dicipline. This is the difference between college and university. At college, you can learn how to answer questions, in university, you learn how to question.

    Now, I am almost done my Masters--I took the full scholarship and am at a different univeristy. There were so many times that I have felt dumb for not understanding concepts and for not doing well in certain subjects. You're here to learn, and to enjoy your experience. Take a chill pill and try to really care about some of your projects--not all of your projects. After 5 years, for every 50 that I got, there was a 90, and for every 60 there was an 80.

    :S

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OP here: You're right - college does teach you how to take a test and replicate information. And that is why I did so well there. The tests were so easy to bull. I can win multiple choice every time. And I guess that is where my stress is coming from. I didn't do so hot on some mid terms recently and it kinda took me back a bit. I am not used to doing fully essay written exams.

      So yes, I suppose you are right. Thanks for the enlightened words.

      Delete
    2. Rockin'
      The courses and projects that have questions which keep you up at night--either restless from pondering or excited from writing--are the best.

      I suggest that every student should take the free writing courses that help one write essays better. That way, when we finally do get interested in a topic, we are better able to express it.

      :S

      Delete
  10. I graduated university on the dean's list and am currently hoping like hell i passed the college midterm i wrote today...

    ReplyDelete
  11. no offense but I took a few courses at a college and it felt like high school. their expectations are way lower than university. you really can't expect the same results coming to university.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a really different environment that's trying to achieve a different end.

      Delete
    2. Exactly. It also depends what you're in college for - if you're trying to replicate your experience (taking similar courses) from college, you're going to have a difficult time doing so. There's programs catered to all types of people - some have higher standards than others and some attract different types of people.

      Delete
  12. How is 85 considered great? I'm average at best.

    ReplyDelete