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Updated on Wednesday, October 1

#19885

OMG: I wondered how Ontario could go from a prosperous have province to a failed have-not province. Then I look at the people here and understand why.

16 comments

  1. Liberals, man.

    "Spend whatever we want! The economy will grow so fast it'll make up for the lost revenue in no time!"

    *economy doesn't grow fast enough*

    "Let's just raise hydro rates and corporate taxes, that'll work!"

    *businesses leave the province because of high costs*

    "Ummm... shit."

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    1. While that was a bit simplified, he's pretty much got it right. It's a shame they'll always be in power here, because people don't understand that just because they promise a bunch of nice stuff doesn't mean it wont come without costs.

      I'm no conservative voter, but damnit, shit needs to be cut. We're spending so much money that we're only running ourselves dry and it's sad that people don't understand that.

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    2. Meh. Wynne is more fiscally responsible than people give her credit for. Speaking as someone who voted PC in the recent election, I think certain measures - like the fact Wynne has frozen all spending increases to social programs for the next 3 years, for instance - will go a long way towards getting our spending on track.

      That said, I don't think the Liberals will always be in power in Ontario. The PC's absolutely have the ability to recover and take over... but it'll take some time, and a lot depends on whether or not their next leader is a social conservative (they're screwed if he/she is).

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    3. If the liberals were to receive a report card, they'd get a passing grade, but only because liberal governments have made it impossible to fail and inflated marks to the point where they mean nothing because anyone half intelligent is getting 90+.

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    4. This thread is why I love Waterloo.

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    5. The economy isn't the only thing that matters. I would still like to see more social programs and environmental research, even if it affects our economy.

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    6. 1e those things cost money. Money that doesn't exist in a failed economy.

      When your economy is strong, you can afford to divert funding to things like social programs and research, and it won't slow growth or job creation. Strong economic conditions also result in higher average disposable incomes, which creates perfect circumstances for governments to incentivize private charitable donations and research investment.

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    7. You know it's bad when QUEBEC has more austerity in its budget than you.

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    8. I don't know if anyone should be championing austerity. It's gone over like a lead balloon in Europe, and there are a lot of economists who say that by not adopting austerity and by increasing spending, you stimulate the economy and help to pull yourself out of economic low tides.

      Furthermore, in the past provincial election, the PCs ran on an explicit austerity platform (argue if you want, it's the truth), and they lost in a landslide. Clearly people in Ontario do not want to go this route.

      Finally, Ontario has traditionally been a manufacturing powerhouse. Unfortunately, events in the last decade, such as the rising Canadian dollar, 2008 recession, and ever increasing loosening of trade restrictions means that while Ontario now enjoys few of its past advantages, there isn't much we as a province can do about it, since these are things that are outside our control.

      On a whole, Ontario does pretty well. Our debt to GDP ratio is a little high, but our cost of services per capita is the lowest of any province. Hopefully a majority liberal government can now take serious action, and while I do think Wynne is capable of turning things around, I will admit I was not a fan on McGuinty.

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  2. Ontario isn't doing well, but don't paint over our people with one brush. I grew up in a hard working family and we are most certainly aren't "have-not" people.

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    1. 2, "have-not" refers more to the fact that Ontario is now on the receiving end of support from other provinces in the form of transfer payments, despite being the most populous province in the country.

      These days, it's Newfoundland and Alberta whose wealth is paying for Ontario and Quebec's poor spending choices.

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    2. ^This is a commonly held belief, but it is a bit more complicated than this. The term "have-not province" is mostly bandied about in sensationalist media, and isn't a good indicator of how well a province is actually doing.

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  3. Our have-not status can also be attributed to the de-industrialization (primarily manufacturing) of our province which drove the Ontario economy for so long. While technology (holla KW) is a great revenue generator, this sector and others just haven't been able to make up for our financial hemorrhaging.

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  4. This province has zero vision. It takes people from other provinces to guide them. Rather sad.

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    1. More like, we keep losing our people to Alberta's fast-growing job market.

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  5. Laws of physics my friend.

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