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Updated on Monday, September 22

#19820

OMG: The effects of Ontario's "grade inflation" are really starting to show, and not in a good way.

15 comments

  1. McGuinty: "Our graduation rates aren't high enough! How do we fix this!"

    Wynne (as education minister): "Let's just make it easier to graduate high school by watering down the curriculum! Easier Math! Less literacy! Let's tell teachers they aren't allowed to give 0s to students on assignments!"

    The result, several years later: everyone graduates high school with better grades, but about half the intelligence, not to mention no ability to think critically.

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    1. Fucking Liberals. They've turned our education system into a backwater joke AND made us the biggest 'have not' province in Canada.

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  2. They teach calculus as an afterthought in high school. Can't believe we wasted the entirety of grade 9 on damn 2d lines

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    1. Did you know they used to teach quadratics and other fun things that are mostly part of the grade 10 curriculum now, in grade 9 as well? They even used to give you an introduction to linear equations in grade 8.
      They'd teach basic functions in grade 10, and by grade 11 you'd be getting pre-calculus.

      That freed up room for all of grade 12 to teach calculus, vectors, geometry, and discrete mathematics. But too many people were failing geometry/discrete math, so they scrapped it and slowed the curriculum to a snail's pace.

      And that's saying nothing about the college prep stream - especially in Math, where it got so bad that Ontario's Colleges have now started requiring 3U/M and 4U/M math for its incoming students, on the grounds that 3C and 4C don't sufficiently prepare them for what lies ahead.

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    2. @2a.

      They no longer have quadratics in grade 9? That is crazy.

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    3. Yeah 2b, they introduce it halfway through grade 10.

      They don't even introduce functions as a concept, until grade 11.

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  3. It's a bad idea that they scrapped the discrete math and water down the curriculum. Students are less likely to be prepared thus high retention rate

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  4. I'm 25 taking some classes with 18 year-olds (yes, I know) and it is painfully obvious that high school has been watered down, especially in the math department. I was dumbfounded when I learned that teachers are no longer allowed to fail students. Any short term "gains" will be quickly offset by students either dropping out of university or college, or the universities and colleges dumbing down their material to accommodate the de facto lower entrance standards.

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  5. Intellect falling, arrogance increasing. Bad combo for the future.

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  6. *sigh* Ontario

    We don't have this kind of issues in Quebec. Yes, there have been a lot of complaints about the curriculum being slowed down and simplified as well, but by the end of grade 12, everyone has a strong background in maths with calculus, geometry, vectors and discrete mathematics covered.

    Also, grade 12 is just as hard if not harder than a UW engineering session. There are 7 courses per session including university level math and sciences, humanities, languages, etc. etc.

    UW is so easy.

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    1. 6, last I checked, there weren't complaints about 'grade inflation' in Ontario Universities. UW is ranked well above *most* Quebec Universities - it's our high schools that are the problem (and it's a problem resulting in a learning curve that our first-year students run into in a way that first-years in other provinces don't).

      Quebec has its own set of issues - though I like how the new government there is finally starting to sort a lot of those problems out. Sooner or later though, he's gonna have to raise tuition....

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    2. Have fun in second year. :^)

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    3. Uni admin will start facing questions as to why there are so many students failing their programs. This will result in watering down of university content as well. It is already well started with all the "studies" programs in university.

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    4. 6c, that's not so much how curriculum adjustment works at the University level. Universities don't face a drop in funding if their grades drop - if anything, they face an increase in prestige. It's their research output they want to be high.

      Retention IS important, and the most likely path they'd take would be to look at existing methodologies and make sure they're working effectively.

      Not that 'easy tracks' don't exist - general degrees, "studies" programs, etc. - but ultimately the stuff it was hard to get a degree in 30 years ago is still really hard to get a degree in now.

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