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Updated on Monday, July 28

#19535

OMG: The arts academic advisors suck. Incorrect information, lazy and just shameful. I'm talking to you, advisor person, so you will help me figure out my requirements, not so you can tell me to figure it out for myself; it's your job, that is why you have a job. WTF.

32 comments

  1. Fuck off, "figure out your requirements"?

    If you somehow can't manage do to that by now (I had mine figured out when I applied in fucking high school), then learn how and consider it part of your education.

    TL;DR You were wasting their time

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  2. OP here, I think maybe you are confused as to what I meant by 'figure out my requirements'. I am in an old undergraduate calendar year and there are copious amounts of mistakes on the website. I was already was unable to graduate once because of their mistakes and trying to figure out by myself if I completed them all correctly. Are you even in Arts? My guess is that you are in science or engineering (guessing by your attitude) where requirements are perfectly set out for you every year of your program. Not like in arts where classes are sporadically offered, and the requirements are vague, complicated and often idiotic. There is no way you knew if you properly completed all of your University requirements for graduation, when you were in high school, you ass. "Wasting their time" what the fuck do you think their job is? What's with the attitude man? Seriously, take a fucking chill pill.

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    1. Was about to comment on the first comment and read this... I agree. The 1st Comment was fucking rude.

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    2. what kind of mistakes?

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    3. OP here: 2b, It was an old undergraduate calendar, and since then they have re-made the web page and it was corrected.

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  3. SUSAN FUCKING ANDREWS.

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    1. YES. She needs to understand that her job is to advise students of their academic careers in ARBUS, not shit on your dreams and tell you that you should switch the fck out of UW. Also - she will take her vacation during the middle of the term. -_-

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    2. +1 SHE'S FUCKING HORRIBLE

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    3. I've never interacted with this person, however I can tell you that UW does employe some of the shittiest and most worthless administrative staff in the world.

      It is almost impossible to be fired from a staff position at UW so when terrible people are in a position, you either hope they leave or retire.

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  4. I dunno I prefer Arts to Science advisors

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    1. Don't even go near CS. Wait in line for 45 minutes then get told they can't help you ("what do you mean you can't override the course limit, I pre-enrolled and need it to graduate") after being in there for 2 minutes.

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  5. University employee here. I hate people like OP, entitled little shits with gargantuan entitlement complexes who have been letting their parents think for them the first 18 years of their life, then come to university and expect us to do the thinking for them. If you had thought to use google (which you clearly didn't), you would have searched "uwaterloo", your faculty, and the word "requirements" and would have found that the first link is probably exactly what you're looking for.

    Stop wasting the advisors time, start using your head, and get your act together.

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    1. Seriously, did you not read OPs reply. I'm already having the same issues as OP and I've done exactly what you've said and even tried to make a schedule for myself for the next few years. The thing is with arts and major requirements is that courses change and what you need may not be offered later on. Academic advisors are there to give us advice and help where we may be confused. OP's not asking for much, just advise on what courses are needed. You don't need to be so rude.

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    2. OP here again. #9 since you are a university employee, why don't you explain to all of us what the job responsibilities of an Academic Advisors are?

      Also, you are correct if you use google, your requirements will come right up, unless you are in an old undergraduate calendar. Then you have to search a bit. Then if you are doing a minor, you have to find those too and balance those out with your major requirements and Breadth requirements. And then make sure you don't cross count courses, except you can sometimes, and can't other times. THEN, sometimes there are rules for counting courses etc. that are not posted on the website. I understand that you hold a different point of view than I do because you work at the university and have had different experiences behind the scenes, but you are being very harsh and critical of my situation of which you know nothing about. I know I can find my requirements using the University website, but that's just half of it. I have taken 90% of my courses and am hoping to graduate soon. When I used the advisors and system you recommend, last time I tried to graduate and obviously that did not work out so well, I want an advisor, who is paid money to advise students and help them with properly completing their requirements for graduation, to look at my transcript and tell me if I have properly completed my requirements/will have completed my requirements in the next two semesters. That is completely reasonable and quite frankly, your attitude represents the University in a negative light and just illustrates my frustration with the faculty and it's advisors.

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    3. Come on OP.

      Having an advisor help you with courses because the calendar is riddled with errors is ok (though I doubt it had errors).

      Handing them your transcript and asking if you are going to graduate? That seems like incompetence.

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    4. As another staff member on campus, I agree with you 100% #5.

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  6. Not sure if it's the same in Arts, but in Math most of the advisors are profs - i.e. advising is not their first job. Unfortunately this means that they aren't very good at figuring out finicky things like that unless they've seen it and solved it before. I once had a CS advisor tell me to switch my major to CS - for a single term - because I was wondering if I could get an override to take a CS major class.

    What I'd really like to see is a few people working in each faculty whose ONLY JOB is advising and figuring out things like this for the students, who can really take the time to be experts on all the recent course calendars and solving that puzzle of "when will I be able to fill my requirements".

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    1. Haha I had them try to get me to switch my major to cs for a term too, what the fuck are they thinking

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  7. When your requirements change for a part of your program depending on what year you were accepted, and only the most recent requirements are available are on the undergraduate calendar, which you have not taken.. Sorry, but you really can't respond to an e-mail to tell me the old requirements? If you're off campus my advisor literally will never reply to your emails or voicemails.. I realize high volume of students but part of your job is paid to check your e-mail...

    Or say shit, you're coming up to graduate and are in this program and this specialization which I oversee here is your checklist?

    The advisors have not helped me one freaking time except when acquiring my transcripts from a semester abroad, but not one told me I would have to forfeit my co-op, and while occasionally I get e-mails with course offerings (i.e. this course is only offered every other year, or this will be in winter and not fall etc) I mostly don't for my major and it really fucks you over for planning when you're in co-op and had to do a semester abroad... Here's hoping that my winter courses don't conflict so I can graduate.

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    1. ... you understand that you can view the undergrad calendar for any year, right?

      Here is another moron blaming advisors for their own stupidity.

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  8. But we're innovation and shit!

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  9. Even if OP was asking them a very basic question they still shouldn't be rude and should do their job. It's like when you ask a fast food employee where the ketchup up (when it is right there behind you), they still answer courteously.

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    1. Yeah but what if they answer and you expect them to now come over and grab you some ketchup from right behind you?

      Thats closer to what OP is doing.

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  10. If your program has changed since you started (which probably has happened to the majority of us) you can go to the undergraduate calender and select "List of Calendars" and then the academic year you started. The requirements will all be changed back to that year and then you can select your faculty and then your academic plan and get the correct requirements for that year. (My specialization doesn't even exist any more and I am still able to access it by going through the old calender). I can see this being a potential problem if courses have been changed or cancelled and were once required for your degree. In this case, the advisor should be able to tell you, "You can exchange Arts 201 for Arts 205" or whatever without being a huge ass about it. Everyone I have known in Arts programs seems to understand their requirements and not be this confused over it.

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  11. That's weird. Because I was in deep crap and my arts academic advisor helped me out,she was very professional and told me about all the available options I had, also motivatedl me to work harder and encouraged me to try different things.

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  12. Bit late but...I dealt with advisors from three separate faculties over the course of my undergrad career, and I agree, it's one of the most frustrating experiences. I learned my lesson after the first email to one of them that I was really going to need to have done my research before asking them a question, but even after that, the level of "advising" was always little to none.
    My most frequent problem was that they'd send me a link to a webpage as an answer to my question, but the link wouldn't actually answer my question. I had a system by the end, of emailing them once, with my question and explanation that I'd seen the information available and why it didn't answer my question. Then they'd email me the link they would have emailed me anyway. Then I'd email them back saying "no, see, I said that didn't answer my question." Then they'd answer my question.
    I have also had email conversations dropped (they stopped responding), rude, dismissive interactions when I went to visit in person (nervous, I might add, and just looking for a little advice…from an advisor…), and in general, several frustrating and disheartening experiences.

    On the flip side, I do have to say that when you keep on them, they usually do come through, and I have also had kind and extremely helpful interactions with the same people. My impression is that they are given too much work. To advise an entire faculty is enough. To send out the hoards of emails they seem to daily, I'm sure, is more than enough. In my personal opinion, there should be at least two people for each faculty doing the work that they do. I'm not sure the people in the advising position realize that students see them as an advisor, perhaps akin to a guidance counsellor in high school, and negative or dismissive experiences with these people can really taint someone's experience with the university.

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